Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College

***PLEASE NOTE, THIS EDITION IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT. THERE IS A NEW EDITION AVAILABLE, TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION 2.0. PLEASE SEE THE LINK FOR THAT PRODUCT ON THIS PAGE.***

Teach Like a Champion offers effective teaching techniques to help teachers, especially those in their first few years, become champions in the classroom. These powerful techniques are concrete, specific, and are easy to put into action the very next day. Training activities at the end of each chapter help the reader further their understanding through reflection and application of the ideas to their own practice.

Among the techniques:

  • Technique #1: No Opt Out. How to move students from the blank stare or stubborn shrug to giving the right answer every time.
  • Technique #35: Do It Again. When students fail to successfully complete a basic task—from entering the classroom quietly to passing papers around—doing it again, doing it right, and doing it perfectly, results in the best consequences.
  • Technique #38: No Warnings. If you’re angry with your students, it usually means you should be angry with yourself. This technique shows how to effectively address misbehaviors in your classroom.

The print versionincludes a DVD of 25 video clips of teachers demonstrating the techniques in the classroom. E-book customers: please note that details on how to access the content from the DVD may be found in the e-book Table of Contents. Please see the section: “How to Access DVD Contents”

Details

  • Paperback: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (April 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470550473
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470550472
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.7 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars See all reviews (462 customer reviews)
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4 thoughts on “Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College”

  1. I bought TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION despite its admittedly cheesy title and without knowing that it was featured by the NY TIMES (which I gather from a sampling of other reviews). Before finishing Doug Lemov’s introduction, I realized I was reading a book from “the charter camp” or the “standardized tests slash data is everything” camp. OK. Not having a closed mind (last I checked), I took a deep breath and dove in. Coming out the other end of the rabbit hole, I see that Lemov’s Wonderland is not for everybody, but there’s something in it for everybody. I said someTHING (or things). Others may find it far too elementary (literally — given the age groups covered — and figuratively). And though all of Lemov’s teachers and examples come from private and charter schools and most of them are from the Uncommon Schools he himself is a part of, public school teachers can glean something from this mixed bag, too.

    Let’s start with the good: TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION is a practical book with strategies that can be used immediately in the classroom. You can use all, some, or a few if you wish. Why do I mention this first? Many teachers who invest in professional development books complain that their purchases are too much on theory and not enough on practical ideas. That won’t be the case here. Satisfied?

    Next: this is about as basic a nuts and bolts text as you can buy. Lemov names things experienced teachers might not even bother to, such as “No Opt Out” (meaning: it’s bad to let a kid say, “I don’t know”) and “Right Is Right” (meaning: you have to answer the question fully and accurately). Still, what looks obvious to teachers already in the trenches might not be to newbies and interested parents.Read more ›

  2. I am not sure where to begin, as I feel like the cliché David attacking Goliath. Although I believe that my lone voice may not cause much of an effect, I feel an obligation to level my criticism towards this book.
    First, I will show you the weaknesses conceptually and then I will give my personal experience as a teacher to back it up. The main problem of this book is very simple, it lacks generalizability. This means you can not take the words from this situation and then inductively assume that it follows these are “49 techniques that put students on the path to college.” It is very pathetic, sad and disappointing that thousands of college-educated adults (student teachers and teacher) could not see this. This line of “research” is known as process-product research, and it basically looks back from a result (student achievement) to the techniques that teachers performed in their classrooms. Even in the most well-designed, objective studies conducted by actual scientists and researchers they are the first to acknowledge that their results in those PARTICULAR classrooms may not transfer to ALL teachers everywhere.
    However, Lemov (A Harvard Business school MBA) can not see, or more likely purposefully deceives his readers, of this fact. But Lemov actually takes this problem of generalizability to an extreme, nearly absurd, level. Because he chooses a very specific context, a network of charter schools in North East Cities with a high African-American population, and then generalizes his “findings” (which have no transparent method or discussion of results or data for the reader to review) to ALL teachers, ALL students and ALL classrooms his ideas lack any thing resembling generalizability. This is nonsense!Read more ›

  3. You simply won’t find a more usable, clear-headed break down of the moves that great teachers use everyday to drive academic achievement in schools that serve low-income kids. I’ve been training and coaching teachers for the past 10 years, and there’s nothing out there that holds a candle to Doug Lemov’s work. The key is that Lemov’s stuff is highly observable and practiceable. As a teacher or a teacher coach, you can put your finger on specific actions that were or were not taken — and then you can practice those actions — literally out loud, in the mirror, with a partner — to make measurable improvements in the next lesson you teach. Most teacher education deals in the realm of the abstract or the long-term. Lemov’s material has tremendous long-term benefits and a powerful, cohesive philosophical underpinning — just like some of the things you learn in a traditional Ed School setting. But he makes these abstract ideas actionable and repeatable. And it’s the combination of “get better now” while working toward a long-term vision of great teaching that makes this book absolutely indispensible. Essential.

  4. This book spells out in detail so many things that you’ve been told, heard, sort of know or have stumbled onto in teaching. But, instead of just suggesting a broad strategy (ask a question before choosing who will answer it, for instance), it really drills down into all the different ways to ask questions, how to plan ahead so that students know whether you want a class response or an individual response, how to decide if you want hands up or down, and the pros and cons of each.

    These are the specifics I realized I needed once I had my own classroom — and by then it’s harder to observe other teachers and harder to get ideas. Observations are wasted on student teachers! It’s the new teachers that really know what they need to look for and the questions they want answered. So far (I’m about halfway, because it definitely requires that you stop, think and process some of the distinctions and differences he makes between techniques), this book is exactly that resource.

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