Dear Bully: Seventy Authors Tell Their Stories

Today’s top authors for teens and young people come together to share their stories about bullying—as bystanders, as victims, and as the bullies themselves—in this moving and deeply personal collection. Lauren Oliver, R. L. Stine, Ellen Hopkins, Carolyn Mackler, Kiersten White, Mo Willems, Jon Scieszka, Lauren Kate, and many more contributed 70 heartfelt and empathetic stories from each corner of the schoolyard. In addition, Dear Bully includes resources for teens, educators, and parents, and suggestions for further reading.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen; First Edition first Printing edition (2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006206097X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062060976
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.9 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
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4 thoughts on “Dear Bully: Seventy Authors Tell Their Stories”

  1. Finally got my copy of Dear Bully. I dont agree with rate this book because you cant judge other’s experiences or stories. I did give it a 5 so other’s will take a look at this book. There is a lot of emotion in this read. I wish everyone who has been bullied or who is a bully to read this book.

    This book is POWERFUL!!!!! Everyone has dealt with a bully sometime in there life. I encourage you all to write your own Dear Bully letter……..
    Here’s mine

    Dear Bully,

    I use to love swimming, I remember spending all my summer at the pool with my best friend. I was only trying to “be cool”, like you. Join in on your conversation, maybe make a new friend. You kept me underwater for what seemed like hours. By the time you let go of me, my lungs were burning from the lack of air, the water, and just fear. I never told anyone, not even to this day. You took a joy away from me, but you did give me something in return. You put such a deep fear of drowning in me that when I had kids, swimming was one of the first things to learn. My husband taught each one to swim. Not just for fun, but for survival. So thank you, thank you that my kids know what to do if they are ever in a situation where they are held underwater. They know how to save someone else’s life. They know the importance of swimming safety. Maybe one day I’ll even try to go back into the water, who knows.

    Your not to funny joke,

    Me

  2. If you have ever been bullied, pick this book up!

    If you’ve ever been a bully and wondered if your words and actions really effected the person you bullied, pick this book up!

    If you’ve ever thought bullying doesn’t really effect anyone, than you REALLY need to pick this book up

    If you’re dealing with a bully or know someone who is, GO PICK THIS BOOK UP, because you will realize you are not alone! In fact, you’re far from it. There’s a whole slew of authors who know what you’re going through and believe me, their stories will effect you one way or another.
    They’ll do more than make you realize you do have a friend in all this, they’ll inspire and empower you to rise above the crap you’re having to deal with, and help you to realize you are far better than those who are or are trying to bring you down.

    Normally when I read a book like this I like to talk a little about each author’s story, but this book is different. There are so many stories that one, there’s no way I could fit it all in one post, or even two, and two, this entire book is one that at times made me cry, made me smile, made me think, made re-count my middle grade years, and more. Dear Bully made me think of my bullying experiences and made me think of the things I’ve done to others that may have effected them in ways I was effected by a bully, not that I was a bully, but this book makes you realize that all the things we do and say no matter how big or how little effect someone.

    You know the old saying, “sticks and stones may break my bones, but your words will never hurt me!” Well many of us know that words are far more powerful than that saying indicates and have a longer, lasting effect than a broken bone.Read more ›

  3. Okay, it is really hard to review this, since it has so many short stories and literally each one is so different from the next. There are some that are very moving, others that make you want to throw the book across the floor. I am glad that some of the stories did not shy away from reality and the authors were honest in saying that, even now as adults, they still haven’t gotten over being bullied. I am also glad they included stories from people who bullied. You know that scene in Mean Girls where they raise their hands and literally everyone has been bullied, but everyone has also, at some point, BULLIED, and if we ignore the latter, bullying cannot be addressed. We are all bullies and we are all survivors of bullying. My biggest problem with the book, though, was the stories where authors made it seem like life was heavenly after a certain point, be it middle school or high school, or college, and that’s just…not true, not in my experience. Life doesn’t get easier or better, it just gets different. The bullying takes on different forms (one author did mention that, yeah, bullying doesn’t stop, it just becomes more subtle and therefore more difficult to deal with.) It’s really nice to think that bullying somehow ends after a certain point, but it really doesn’t. Anyway, it’s an important book, because it does spur conversations about bullying, and that is always a good thing, we need more discussion and more positive action, but I’m kind of annoyed by TOO much positivity. It’s not all good. It does not get better. We have to work to MAKE it better, and we’re not doing that.

  4. I love the concept of this book, and even after reading it, I still love the idea of it, I also love that a portion of the book sales go to a charity to stop bullying, which I think is so important in today’s society. I wanted to really connect to the stories in a deep and emotional way, and unfortantly many of them I didn’t. There were a few that really hit home for me, but for the most part, I felt almost bored by the stories. I wanted them to be powerful and moving, but many of them had the same recurring theme of “hang on and it will get better”, which fustrated me a bit, because if I was a teen and a victim of bullying, I think hearing that over and over again would fustrate me, because unfortantly it’s not really giving them a solution.

    Now onto the story that really hit home for me and that was Slivers of Purple Paper by Cyn Balog, this story hit me in a deep and thought provoking way, I myself had a similar experience in high school, and getting a note from someone that you changed their life in a significant way is a very powerful thing, and one that has stuck with me my entire life.

    Maybe I didn’t connect as much as some people because although I was heavier then most in High School I had a lot of friends, and although I do remember a few instances of being called names or being teased, nothing was as horrible as what many people deal with every day. I never wanted to stay home to avoid a bully, and I never had my books knocked out of my hands or was shoved into a locker. I also don’t think I was a bully, I really prided myself on being friends with everyone, from the cool kids to the not-so-cool kids.Read more ›

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